Who was ida tarbell

What is Ida Tarbell known for?

Ida Tarbell, in full Ida Minerva Tarbell, (born November 5, 1857, Erie county, Pennsylvania, U.S.—died January 6, 1944, Bridgeport, Connecticut), American journalist, lecturer, and chronicler of American industry best known for her classic The History of the Standard Oil Company (1904).

Why did Ida Tarbell expose Standard Oil?

One result largely attributable to Tarbell’s work was a Supreme Court decision in 1911 that found Standard Oil in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act. The Court found that Standard was an illegal monopoly and ordered it broken into 34 separate companies.

Why is Ida Tarbell bad?

Tarbell was wrong on both counts. Standard Oil’s business practices were more ruthless than she had ever thought possible, and in her telling they became a page-turning tale of coercion, deception, and hubris. The key ingredient for Tarbell’s success came from her unprecedented access to primary source material.

What was the importance of Ida Tarbell most famous work?

In her most famous work, The History of the Standard Oil Company (which oil historian Daniel Yergin called the “most important business book ever written”), Miss Tarbell revealed, after years of painstaking research, the illegal means used by John D. Rockefeller to monopolize the early oil industry.

What did journalist Ida Tarbell reveal in her exposé of Standard Oil?

She was the only woman in her graduating class at Allegheny College in 1880. The McClure’s magazine journalist was an investigative reporting pioneer; Tarbell exposed unfair practices of the Standard Oil Company, leading to a U.S. Supreme Court decision to break its monopoly.

What happened after Ida Tarbell exposed the oil company?

Tarbell brought the company’s shady dealings to light, and the federal government sued Standard Oil. The Supreme Court ordered Standard Oil’s breakup in 1911, but only after more narrowly defining illegal monopoly. Congress strengthened antitrust laws with the Federal Trade Commission Act and Clayton Antitrust Act.

Was Upton Sinclair a muckraker?

Sinclair thought of himself as a novelist, not as a muckraker who investigated and wrote about economic and social injustices. But The Jungle took on a life of its own as one of the great muckraking works of the Progressive Era. Sinclair became an “accidental muckraker.”

Who was the first investigative journalist?

Nellie Bly, America’s First Investigative Journalist, Was a 23-Year-Old Woman – The Atlantic.

Which quote is associated with Ida Tarbell?

Imagination is the only key to the future.Without it none exists – with it all things are possible.

Is The Jungle accurate?

The novel, while containing an abundance of true events, is fictional. Jurgis Rudkus and his family are not real people. Rather, their story is an amalgamation of stories Sinclair was exposed to. He utilized the fictional immigrant family as a vehicle for nonfictional anecdotes.

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